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Detected Early Bowel Cacer is the Most Curable Cancer Early Detection is your best Protection

BOWELSCAN AND ITS SUCCESS

At 43, Ross didn't seriously think a bowel scan would reveal problems but the kit he bought from Rotarians at a shopping centre stall last year proved him wrong.
Ross said: " It came back with a positive result, which means they found blood traces in my stools.
A colonoscopy showed Ross had two polyps, which had undergone basic cell changes and were turning cancerous. The polyps were immediately removed.
“So 1 could still be walking around with bigger polyps, and perhaps the cancerous cells would have migrated to other parts of my body."

Unnamed Aged 69...
Thought bleeding was the result of haemorrhoids. Positive test from 'bowel scan" and subsequent colonoscopy revealed cancer in colon, since operated on successfully.

Unnamed Aged 59...
“Bowelscan” detected cancer, since operated on successfully

Keith Aged 75...
Lynn and 1 decided that $6.00 was small amount to pay for a check up. Mine came back positive blood, my doctor recommended a colonoscopy to try and locate the problem.
An unusual growth was found at the far end of my large Intestine. The growth was removed surgically.
“Following my discharge, 1 have been counselled (I believe that this is the correct word) and advised that a dose of chemotherapy is recommended.
Apparently there are 4 stages of growth of these things and mine is about half way. It has penetrated the wall of the Intestine and was trying to get out into the rest of the system, scattering a few cancer cells in the process. The chemo is designed to eliminate this, and the chance of a full recovery within 5 years appears to be favourable.”

Unnamed Rotarian's Relative…
“At changeover, the outgoing President of the Rotary Club of Loganholme revealed that a relative had been diagnosed with bowel cancer after partaking in the recent Bowelscan program. That person will be operated on during July and as the cancer is in Stage 1, that person has a 95% chance of a total cure, from a disease which kills an Australian every 2 hours.

BOWELSCAN A Rotary Community Awareness Project

I have been invited by Bill Oliphont to publicly thank John Filewood and the club, for saving my life.

Big words. But very true it could happen to any one of us.

About the middle of last March, an article appeared in the Gatton Star Newspaper, inserted by Rotary, recommending that each and everyone should have a bowel scan --with services provided by John Filewood.
(Question? How many members have made use of this offer)
Just imagine John with a torch scanning!!!

Lynn and I decided that $6.00 was a small amount to pay for a check up, and we picked up our kits from the Lockyer Valley Chemist at the Medical Centre.

For those not familiar with the procedure, one obtains a kit which contains a moisture proof envelope, a cardboard insert, containing three little pockets and a sheet of instructions. For a period of three consecutive days, one is asked to provide a small sample from their toilet paper, using the wooden paddles provided (similar to the icecream ones), for the purpose. Then, all that we had to do was to drop the package into a container in John's Chemist and wait results.]

Mine came back positive Blood in the sample--please contact your Doctor as soon as possible.
Peter Bevan took one look at the report and referred me to a surgeon in Toowoomba, (this had been delayed a month due to our holiday in New Zealand)

A colonoscopy was recommended in order to try and locate the problem.
This is an exercise when an instrument is inserted into your colon so that the
surgeon can explore the internals. The preparation is far worse than the
Investigation -- Has anyone here had the experience?

Anyway an unusual growth about the size of a thumbnail was spotted right at the far end of my large intestine and it was considered that it should be surgically removed

I was admitted into hospital within a few days, and underwent immediate surgery. Judging from his diagrams, about 6 inches of my intestine was removed, joined up again, and stitched up. I spent 5 days in hospital.

Following my discharge, I have been counselled (I believe that this is the correct word) and advised that a dose of chemotherapy is recommended.
Apparently there are 4 stages of growth of these things and mine is about half way. It has penetrated the wall of the intestine and was trying to get out into the rest of the system, scattering a few cancer cells in the process.
The chemo is designed to eliminate this, and the chance of a full recovery within 5 years appew to be favourable.

SO

To summarise, if Rotary had not published this article, I could have succumbed to cancer within a few years. After the op I tried to contact Ray Inglis and Dave Munroe in order to thank them but could not find them the local Phone Book. I then visited the Lockyer Pharmacy only to find that John Filewood was on leave.

Therefore, 1 have now been given the opportunity to publicly thank the Rotary club for this service which has no doubt saved my life--
I thank you all.'

Go the whole way to beat bowel cancer

AT least half our daily servings of breads, cereals, rice and pasta should be wholemeal or whole grain to help reduce our risk of cancer, according to advice from The Cancer Council NSW.

It is the first quantitative recommendation for whole grain foods from a cancer organisation in Australia.

The advice comes after a review of the evidence by the CSIRO that concluded consumption of whole grains reduces the risk of bowel cancer.

The minimum recommended intake of grain based foods for a healthy adult is four serves a day.

A 'serve' is two slices of bread, one cup of cooked rice/pasta/porridge, one and a third cups of flaked breakfast cereal, or three wheat flake biscuits.

“Bowel cancer is now the most common cancer and the third leading cause of cancer death in NSW," Cancer Council regional manager Jenny Beach said.

"So the community needs to be aware that a diet high in vegetables, fruit and fibre and low in fat, salt and preserved foods will significantly reduce their risk of developing bowel cancer,' she said.

Western Institute of TAFE students and staff will be preparing and serving the Cancer Smart breakfast for participants in the Cancer Councils Relay for Life from 6am on Sunday, March

More Info http://www.bowelcare.org.au/

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